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Saturday, October 08, 2011

A potted history of the rugby world cup, the rules of the game and rugby boots Nine: Rugby Injuries




Most authorities estimate approximately one fifth of rugby injuries involve boots. The vast majority of injuries arise during the close season when payers are out of condition and find the intensity of pre-season training too much. Hard pitch surfaces account for 70 per cent of the injuries where players are wearing ill-fitting boots not suited to dry conditions. All players are encouraged to keep their fitness up during the close season to avoid inflammation of the plantar fascia. Keen amateurs and professionals usually have individual fitness programs that last throughout the year.



As a hard, high speed, high impact sport injuries are not uncommon. Some on-the-field injuries are avoidable, or the severity decreased when players have optimal strength and conditioning to offset the effects of fatigue which pre-empt mistakes, increase player instability and affect concentration. Many overuse injuries are caused during training or exacerbated in a game, most are avoidable with rest and recovery alongside hard, moderate and easy training sessions.



Other injuries are due to mistimed or dangerous tackles and no amount of training can prevent these. Falls or hits taken in a ruck or maul happen in every game and overuse injuries or imbalances that have-not been adequately addressed will also take their toll despite best preparations. Foot injuries are rare compared to ankle and knee incidents. Boot designs attempt to reduce excess torque and twist.



A frequent complaint is lateral ligament sprains common to the position of second row forward and usually due to landing badly. Unless the injury is completely rested and adequately rehabilitated then chronic ankle strain will weaken the player.



Inversion ankle sprains usually referred to, as ankle sprains are another challenge many rugby players face. The foot gets turned inwards to the ankle and this injury is found in both forwards and backs. It can result from slipping in the mud, an unbalanced step when running, side-stepping or jinking, in the tackle, or when landing from the lineout or any other jump. The symptoms are acute pain, and inability to run or continue to play. The site of damage swells, which can sometimes be, controlled a little by a high cut boot. When the injury is very minor and the ligaments are pulled but not damaged it may be possible to 'run it off'. If there is a great deal of pain and walking impossible, it maybe the fibula is cracked or broken.



Playing on muddy pitch can fatigue the player and put undue strain on the hamstring muscles. This may lead to strain caused by accelerated movement. Like all the football codes knee injuries to players frequently include anterior cruciate ligament tears, meniscal tears, medial collateral, ligament sprains, patellar dislocations, posterior cruciate ligament tears. Most of the medial collateral ligament sprains occur in rugby forwards and 60-70% of anterior cruciate ligament tears occurred in rugby backs. All other injuries occurred with equal frequency in backs and forwards.

Read more
A potted history of the rugby world cup, the rules of the game and rugby boots Part One: Introduction
A potted history of the rugby world cup, the rules of the game and rugby boots Part Two: History of the Games
A potted history of the rugby world cup, the rules of the game and rugby boots Part Three: Rules of the Games
A potted history of the rugby world cup, the rules of the game and rugby boots Part Four: Rugby Boots
A potted history of the rugby world cup, the rules of the game and rugby boots Part Five: Studs or Cleats
A potted history of the rugby world cup, the rules of the game and rugby boots Part Six: Flower of Scotland
A potted history of the rugby world cup, the rules of the game and rugby boots Part Seven: How to choose rugby boots
A potted history of the rugby world cup, the rules of the game and rugby boots Part Eight: The Haka
A potted history of the rugby world cup, the rules of the game and rugby boots Nine: Rugby Injuries

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