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Thursday, February 13, 2014

Subway® Restaurants to remove food additive



North Americans pay closer attention to what they eat and food companies have tp work to market their products as natural. But companies have also come under growing pressure to remove chemicals people find questionable. That pressure has been heightened by consumers' ability to voice and share their concerns online. After a successful campaign by popular food blogger, FoodBabe.com, Olympic sponsor Subway are now in the process of removing a chemical from its bread as part of an ongoing effort to improve its recipes. Seems azodicarbonamide a derivative of urea is used in Suway’s bread "as a flour bleaching agent." The principal use of azodicarbonamide is in the production of foamed plastics as a blowing agent . The thermal decomposition of azodicarbonamide results in the evolution of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and ammonia gases, which are trapped in the polymer as bubbles to form a foamed article. The product is used to make yoga mats and shoe rubber. Azodicarbonamide as a blowing agent in plastics has been banned in Europe since August 2005 for the manufacture of plastic articles that are intended to come into direct contact with food. The petition noted that Subway did not use the ingredient in its breads in Europe, Australia or other parts of the world. . The thermal decomposition of azodicarbonamide results in the evolution of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and ammonia gases, which are trapped in the polymer as bubbles to form a foamed article. The product is used to make yoga mats and shoe rubber. Azodicarbonamide as a blowing agent in plastics has been banned in Europe since August 2005 for the manufacture of plastic articles that are intended to come into direct contact with food. The petition noted that Subway did not use the ingredient in its breads in Europe, Australia or other parts of the world.

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