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Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Where to go with a sore toe, in Kyoto : The Go-o Jinja Shrine




The Go’o Shrine , in Kyoto, lies on the western side of the Imperial Palace. It celebrates Wake no Kiyomaro (733-799), a high-ranking Japanese official during the Nara period (710 AD – 794 AD). He became a trusted advisor to Emperor Kanmu, before being exiled in 769 and as further punishment had the sinews of his legs cut. The intervention of the Fujiwara clan saved him from being killed. After Empress Shōtoku died, he was recalled and appointed a junior minister of state (Udaijin). According to legend no Kiyomaro was protected by 300 wild boars and his injuries miraculously healed.



The Go’o Jinja Shrine, in Kyoto, lies on the western side of the Imperial Palace. It celebrates Wake no Kiyomaro (733-799), a high-ranking Japanese official during the Nara period (710 AD – 794 AD). He became a trusted advisor to Emperor Kanmu, before being exiled in 769 and as further punishment had the sinews of his legs cut. According to legend no Kiyomaro was protected by 300 wild boars 300 boars who helped him travel to the destination, during which time his injuries miraculously healed. The intervention of the Fujiwara clan probably saved him from being killed and after the Empress Shōtoku died, he was recalled and appointed a junior minister of state (Udaijin).



When he died,Lord Wake no Kiyomaro was enshrined at the Jingo-ji Temple on Mt. Takao, but later relocated to the current site by the order of the Emperor Meiji in 1886. It enshrines the deity of legs. The Go’o Shrine is dedicated to all things pig, and receives visitors from all over who suffer from leg and foot injuries.



A stone block bearing no Kiyomaro footprints is said to heal the injuries.



The entrance to the The Go’o Shrine is guarded by a pair of wild boar. Traditonally Japanese temples have komainu (mythical lion-like beasts).



The shrine is also used as a place for lavish marriage ceremonies. It is situated next to several different hotels that are outfitted to host wedding receptions.



The shrine is located five minutes north of Marutamachi Subway Station on Karasuma Street across from the Imperial Palace visitors' entrance.

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